Plinko drinking game – DIY Drinko Plinko game!

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Get your drink on with this DIY Drinko Plinko or plinko drinking game

The DIY type you will love that to get your creatively engaged. You can DYI and would definitly love it when completed.

We’ve all observed The Cost Is Correct, and one of the best amusements on the show is Plinko where a plate is dropped into the edge, tumbling down through the pins and arriving in an arbitrary box at the base. Well now, there’s a drinking amusement form of it!

In this adaptation, you open your jug at the top and let the top tumble down into one of the crates then take after whatever direction is named on the container! Will you need to make a go, drink up or give a toast another person?

Plinko is the most popular pricing game on The Price is Right. Debuting on January 3, 1983 and created by the late Frank Wayne, it is played for a cash prize of up to $50,000 and also awards prizes valued under $100. It is frequently said to be the most famous of all the pricing games. On January 3, 1983, the game’s first playing, hostBob Barker explained that the name came from the “plink” sound the chips made as they came down the board.

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It’s such an extraordinary thought and will be a genuine hit at any gathering you have. Look at the video beneath which contains full directions.

Play the Drinko Plinko game like the video below and Get the glass and Tools in huge DISCOUN

Get your drink on with this DIY Drinko Plinko game! Share it with your friends, Pin them to give them surprise.

We’ve all observed The Cost Is Correct, and one of the best amusements on the show is Plinko where a plate is dropped into the edge, tumbling down through the pins and arriving in an arbitrary box at the base. Well now, there’s a drinking amusement form of it!

In this adaptation, you open your jug at the top and let the top tumble down into one of the crates then take after whatever direction is named on the container! Will you need to make a go, drink up or give a toast another person?

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It’s such an extraordinary thought and will be a genuine hit at any gathering you have. Look at the video beneath which contains full directions.

History

  • Plinko debuted on January 3, 1983. At the time of its debut, Plinko’s $25,000 top prize was the largest ever offered on The Price Is Right at the time, as Barker noted on the game’s much-promoted debut and the largest allowed under CBS regulations, as the network upped the winnings limit in $25,000 increments, first to $50,000 in 1984, then $75,000 in 1986, then $100,000 in 1990 and finally $125,000 in 1992 (before CBS permanently abolished the limit on game show winnings altogether by the mid-1990s).
  • During Plinko’s first playing, a spinning disco ball with “$25,000” labeled around it was lowered from the ceiling. On January 11, 1983, the game’s second playing, the “Plinko” sign was introduced. The sign was originally placed in the back of the audience (a practice that would be resurrected in the short-lived 1994 syndicated version). On November 29, 1984, the sign was permanently moved to the Turntable, where it remained until December 5, 2002, when it was replaced with a “$50,000” graphic (“$100,000” primetime) on screen; although the Plinko sign was absent from November 11, 1992 to June 18, 1993 and instead also using either a “$25,000” graphic or no graphic at all. On September 22, 2015, the disco ball introduction was revived.
  • When the game debuted, the cue music they played to introduce it was the same one that is normally heard in Grand Game. From January 11, 1983 (the game’s second playing) until April 25, 1995, the first regular music sting combined the harps from Golden Road and Punch-A-Bunch with a famous prize cue titled “The Cats”; two subsequent harp stingers (introduced on May 3, 1995 and November 26, 1997, respectively) were also used to precede “The Cats.” Since January 7, 2003, only the harps from have been used to introduce the game.
  • For Plinko’s first playing only, different “WIN!” cards were used for its small prizes. When a digit in the price of a prize was guessed correctly, the panels on the front of its corresponding podium were flipped over twice, first to reveal the word “WIN!” (which was written diagonally on a white card) along with a Plinko chip, and then again to reveal the actual price. Currently, the panels are flipped over only once, to reveal either a “WIN!” card and the actual price with a Plinko chip for a correct guess, or the actual price on two red cards if the guess is wrong.
  • When first introduced, the front of the Plinko board was open, meaning that the chips were occasionally able to bounce off the board and out onto the stage and had to be replayed. To remedy this problem, a Plexiglas cover was placed over the board; however, that, too, became a problem when chips got stuck and had to be retrieved. The board’s Plexiglas cover now features triangular grid-shaped holes that prevent chips from flying out and still allows stuck chips to be knocked loose through the grid.
  • The only value on the board which has changed since the game was introduced is the center slot. It began at $5,000, with a top prize of $25,000 and remained as such until October 5, 1998. The slot was increased to $10,000 for the first time during the show’s 25th Anniversary Special on August 23, 1996 and was subsequently made permanent on October 15, 1998.
  • 1994’s syndicated The New Price is Right did not use the board layout described above. Most episodes featured a layout (from outside to center): $2,500, $500, $1,000, $0, $5,000. On the first episode that featured Plinko, the game had a layout of $2,500, $1,000, $0, $5,000, $0. The top prize was still $25,000, as on the daytime show. The 1994 syndicated version also used the “higher/lower” format for the small prizes instead of the regular CBS format, since it used three-digit prizes. The highest amount won in this version was $16,500.
  • For the The Price Is Right Live! stage show, the layout on either side is $50, $100, $200, $0, $500, making for a top prize of $2,500.
  • On May 17, 2002, the center slot has doubled to $20,000 on primetime specials, with a top prize of $100,000 (a practice that would be included on both the Million Dollar Spectaculars and Game Show Marathon).
  • On April 4, 2008 (aired out of order on March 7) and May 14, 2008 (aired out of order on May 7), bothMillion Dollar Spectaculars since Drew Carey became host, a $1,000,000 bonus was offered if a contestant could get a bonus golden chip in the $20,000 slot. The golden chip was won if a contestant could first get at least $60,000 (three regular chips in the $20,000 slot) during the normal gameplay. Sadly, neither playing featured such a win condition.
  • The Plinko board is often used by RTL Group-licensed lottery promotions, CBS affiliates and UbiSoft to promote the show. For the promotions, two fishing lines (one on each side of the board, hanging from the side down towards the center slot) are used to “rig” the game, so the dropped chip would always land in the $10,000 slot. After a promotional advertisement for the video game was taped, the wires were mistakenly left in place for the July 22, 2008 1:00pm taping of The Price is Right. As a contestant was playing the game, three consecutive chips she dropped landed in the $10,000 slot. As the fourth chip was being dropped, co-producer Adam Sandler (not to be confused with the actor) realized that the wires were still in place and stopped the chip as it bounced down the board, informing Carey, the show’s new host, of the situation. The wires were removed and the entire segment was re-shot for the show from the point where the contestant began dropping chips. CBS Standards and Practices allowed the contestant to keep the $30,000 won prior to the removal of the wires as well as the money won with the five chips she dropped after the mistake had been corrected. However, the segment that aired (when the show was broadcast on October 6, 2008, aired out of order on December 5) did not reference the mistake or the amount of money won prior to the removal of the wires.
  • On April 23-27, 2012 (aired out of order on April 9-13), for Price’s “Publisher’s Clearing House Week,” Plinko was played for $50,000, but with a twist: the final chip would be worth $20,000 instead of the usual $10,000 if it is hit; it would start at $20,000 and roll over each day it is not hit. If no one hit the $20,000 by Friday’s show, the winner of Friday’s Showcase would win a $25,000 bonus in addition to whatever prizes they won in the Showcase. Summer Johnson, who appeared as a contestant on Monday’s show, was the only contestant to win the $20,000 bonus.
  • On April 26, 2013 and September 23, 2013 (aired out of order on October 18, originally rescheduled to air on October 14), for Price’s “Big Money Week,” Plinko was played for $500,000, with a $100000slot replacing the normal $10000 center slot. Both Samantha Hawley and Clora Hicks won four chips total (three for each pricing item they won, plus the one chip they started with). Samantha only won $1600 (hitting $500, $0, $100 and $1,000, respectively), while Clora won only $2,000 (hitting $0, $500, $1,000 and $500, respectively).
  • On October 4, 2013 (aired out of order on September 27), The Price is Right aired a very special episode in which Plinko was the only game played all show. In addition to cash prizes up to $50,000, regular prizes were also up for grabs.
  • On November 20, 2014 (aired out of order on November 13), October 12, 2015 (aired out of order on October 15, originally rescheduled to air on October 13), and October 25, 2016 during Price’s “Big Money Week,” Plinko was played once again, this time for $1,000,000, with a $200000 slot replacing the normal $10000 center slot (this marked only the fourth time in Price history that Plinko was played for $1,000,000). Eric Cardenas won three chips total (two for each item he won, plus the one chip he started with), only won $600 (hitting $0, $500 and $100, respectively), while Mary Eklund won five chips total but only won $2100 (hitting $1000, $1000, $0, $100, and $0, respectively, and Vanessa Hunt won four chips total (three for each item she won, plus the one chip she started with), only won $1000 (hitting $0, $1000, and $0).
  • On February 19, 2015, during #UDecide week, Plinko replaced the $100 slots with two additional $10,000 slots. On that playing, $13,000 was won in five chips, with one chip landing in the center slot.
  • On April 1, 2015, Plinko was featured on Let’s Make a Deal as part of an April Fools joke. The contestant who played earned $1,600.
  • On May 24, 2016, as part of the episode’s Big Brother theme, Plinko replaced the $100 slot; it moved to the $500 slot from the $100 slot; also, it moved the $1,000 slot from the $500 slot and an additional $2,500 slot. On the February 3, 2017 episode of the daytime show, that same layout was used. It is believed that this will become permanent for the daytime show.
  • On October 10, 2016, as part of CBS 30 Years at #1 special, Plinko was played for $150,000, with the $10,000 slot tripled to $30,000.
  • On February 3, 2017, the values changed; leaving the $100 slots changed to $500, the $500 slots changed to $1,000, and the $1,000 slots changed to $2,500.

We hope you enjoyed this Plinko drinking game.

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